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Insulation for the nation

Did you know two thirds of the UK still have inefficient insulation?

UK houses are rated amongst some of the worst in Europe when it comes to energy efficiency, studies have shown that all houses built before 1990 and 75% of those built before 2010 are inefficient, this is mainly down to poor insulation. Only 29% of these have been retrofitted according to modern standards.

Insulation is one of the most effective ways to retain the internal temperature of your property. By having the correct insulation in place it makes your home more energy efficient, reducing the amount of energy used and cuts down the cost of your energy bills. 

How does insulation work?

In short, insulation creates an additional thermally resistant barrier between the interior of your property and the external elements. The purpose of this barrier is to slow the transfer of thermal energy from inside your home to outside. This means in the winter it helps keeps your home warmer for longer and in summer cooler for longer.

What types of insulation are available?

Property insulation comes in many different forms, each designed for a different area, here are some of the most common: 

Loft Insulation

The most known is loft insulation, it consists of a barrier of material (usually mineral wool) laid between the joists in a properties loft.  The recommended amount is 270mm in thickness and should not be condescend.

Room In Roof Insulation

Sometimes refereed to as warm loft insulation, is where you fit insulation between the rafters (the sloping beams that make up the roof). These sloping ceilings can be insulated using rigid insulation boards and usually have a layer of plasterboard on the inside of the insulation.

Under Floor Insulation

Older homes are most likely to have suspended timber floors. If you have air bricks or ventilation bricks on the outside wall(s) of your house that are below floor level, you probably have a suspended timber floor.

Timber floors can be insulated by lifting the floorboards and laying mineral wool insulation supported by netting on the ground floor between the joists.

Under Floor Insulation Smart Energy Homes
Cavity Wall Insulation

If your house was built after 1930 its more likely that you will have a cavity wall rather than a solid wall. A cavity wall is a wall made of two walls with spacing in-between (a cavity). if it was built before 2010 it probably wasn’t built with insulation but if it hasn’t already, can be retrofitted. There are a few different ways to insulate a cavity wall, the most recommend being the Climabead system.

Internal Wall Insulation

If your house was built before 1930 then you probably have a solid wall or stone wall. A solid wall is usually made of two layer of joined brick, and you can tell a solid wall from an alternating pattern, with some bricks showing the smaller ends from the outside.

Internal wall insulation is done by fitting rigid insulation boards to the wall, by building a stud wall filled in with insulation material, then finished with plasterboard.

Inner wall insulation or Internal wall insulation.
What type of insulation does my property need?

The best places to find out what energy efficient measures your home has in place and which measures your home could benefit from is to check the properties Energy Performance Certificate (EPC). To check your homes EPC visit the Governments online database.

How much will insulation save me?

This can vary from property to property depending on many different factors but as an example The Energy Saving Trust have said that a typical semi-detached house could look to save £355 a year on loft insulation alone if there was none previously installed and it was topped to the recommended amount of 270mm.

Insulation is just one of the energy efficient measures available completely free under the ECO4 scheme. To learn more and to see if your eligible visit our ECO4 page.

Here's just some of the measures that are available under ECO4

Heat Pumps

We use the latest in heat pump technology to help make your home as energy efficient as it should be.

Insulation

The most effective way to make your property more energy efficient and cut down on your energy bills is to make sure its well insulated.

Insulation for the nation

Did you know two thirds of the UK still have inefficient insulation?

UK houses are rated amongst some of the worst in Europe when it comes to energy efficiency, studies have shown that all houses built before 1990 and 75% of those built before 2010 are inefficient, this is mainly down to poor insulation. Only 29% of these have been retrofitted according to modern standards.

Insulation is one of the most effective ways to retain the internal temperature of your property. By having the correct insulation it place it makes your home more energy efficient, reducing the amount of energy used and cuts down the cost of your energy bills.

How does insulation work?

In short, insulation creates an additional thermally resistant barrier between the interior of your property and the external elements. The purpose of this barrier is to slow the transfer of thermal energy from inside your home to outside. This means in the winter it helps keeps your home warmer for longer and in summer cooler for longer.

What types of insulation are available?

Property insulation comes in many different forms, each for a different area, here are some of the most common:

Loft Insulation

The most known is loft insulation, it consists of a barrier of material (usually mineral wool) laid between the joists in a properties loft.  The recommended amount is 270mm in thickness and should not be condescend.

Room In Roof Insulation

Sometimes refereed to as warm loft insulation, is where you fit insulation between the rafters (the sloping beams that make up the roof). These sloping ceilings can be insulated using rigid insulation boards and usually have a layer of plasterboard on the inside of the insulation.

Under Floor Insulation

Older homes are most likely to have suspended timber floors. If you have air bricks or ventilation bricks on the outside wall(s) of your house that are below floor level, you probably have a suspended timber floor.

Timber floors can be insulated by lifting the floorboards and laying mineral wool insulation supported by netting on the ground floor between the joists.

Under Floor Insulation Smart Energy Homes
Cavity Wall Insulation

If your house was built after 1930 its more likely that you will have a cavity wall rather than a solid wall. A cavity wall is a wall made of two walls with spacing in-between (a cavity). if it was built before 2010 it probably wasn’t built with insulation but if it hasn’t already, can be retrofitted. There are a few different ways to insulate a cavity wall, the most recommend being the Climabead system.

Internal Wall Insulation

If your house was built before 1930 then you probably have a solid wall or stone wall. A solid wall is usually made of two layer of joined brick, and you can tell a solid wall from an alternating pattern, with some bricks showing the smaller ends from the outside.

Internal wall insulation is done by fitting rigid insulation boards to the wall, by building a stud wall filled in with insulation material such as mineral wool fibre or a combination of the both.

Inner wall insulation or Internal wall insulation.
What type of insulation does my property need?

The best places to find out what energy efficient measures your home has in place and which measures your home could benefit from is to check the properties Energy Performance Certificate (EPC). To check your homes EPC visit the Governments online database.

How much will insulation save me?

This can vary from property to property depending on many different factors but as an example The Energy Saving Trust have said that a typical semi-detached house could look to save £355 a year on loft insulation alone if there was none previously installed and it was topped to the recommended amount of 270mm.

Insulation is just one of the energy efficient measures available completely free under the ECO4 scheme. To learn more about ECO4 and to see if you’re eligible visit our website.

Here's just some of the measures that are available under ECO4

Heat Pumps

We use the latest in heat pump technology to help make your home as energy efficient as it should be.

Insulation

The most effective way to make your property more energy efficient and cut down on your energy bills is to make sure its well insulated.

What is an EPC?

An Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) is a document that shows how energy efficient your property is. This document will also include an estimated energy cost, a list of energy performance features already in place and recommendations on measures that will improve your properties energy efficiency, with an estimated cost of each measure and how much they will potentially save you. An EPC lasts for 10 years and is required if you want to sell or let your property. 

Did you know two thirds of the UK still have inefficient insulation?
EPC ratings

Your properties energy efficient rating will be scored in a chart from A to G, with A (shown in green) being the highest and G (shown in red) being the lowest. In the chart you will see your properties current rating and its potential rating, the potential rating is what the property could reach if the recommended measures are taken. 

Finding your properties EPC

You can find your EPC on the Governments Online Database and searching for the property by postcode, then property number or name.

My property doesn’t have an EPC

If your property doesn’t have an EPC there is no need to worry, you don’t need an EPC unless you plan on selling or renting the property. If you do need an EPC you can hire an accredited domestic energy assessor to survey your property.

Recommended measures

A great way to save money on your energy bills is to take the recommended measures listed on your properties Energy Performance Certificate (EPC). These recommendations can range from upgrading all the light bulbs in your property for more energy efficient ones, to having internal wall insulation installed. One thing is for sure though all of these recommended  measures have been put on your EPC for a reason, to make your home more energy efficient.

Lowering the price of your energy bills is just one of the benefits of installing the recommended measures and improving your properties EPC. It will also lower carbon emissions and raise the value of your property. 

Funding

With the big push to lower carbon emissions there is almost always some funding or incentive available to help you on your way to a more energy efficient property, it may just take some research to find the scheme that’s right for you. One of the biggest currently available is ECO4 . If you are eligible for ECO4 you could have majority of the recommended measure on your EPC completely free. 

To find out more about ECO4 funding or to apply visit our ECO4 page.

Here's just some of the measures that are available under ECO4

Heat Pumps

We use the latest in heat pump technology to help make your home as energy efficient as it should be.

Insulation

If this is your first time thinking about insulation, then please call one of our experts for a no-obligation chat.

Insulation for the nation

Did you know two thirds of the UK still have inefficient insulation?

UK houses are rated amongst some of the worst in Europe when it comes to energy efficiency, studies have shown that all houses built before 1990 and 75% of those built before 2010 are inefficient, this is mainly down to poor insulation. Only 29% of these have been retrofitted according to modern standards.

Insulation is one of the most effective ways to retain the internal temperature of your property. By having the correct insulation it place it makes your home more energy efficient, reducing the amount of energy used and cuts down the cost of your energy bills.

How does insulation work?

In short, insulation creates an additional thermally resistant barrier between the interior of your property and the external elements. The purpose of this barrier is to slow the transfer of thermal energy from inside your home to outside. This means in the winter it helps keeps your home warmer for longer and in summer cooler for longer.

What types of insulation are available?

Property insulation comes in many different forms, each for a different area, here are some of the most common: 

Loft Insulation

The most known is loft insulation, it consists of a barrier of material (usually mineral wool) laid between the joists in a properties loft.  The recommended amount is 270mm in thickness and should not be condescend.

Room In Roof Insulation

Sometimes refereed to as warm loft insulation, is where you fit insulation between the rafters (the sloping beams that make up the roof). These sloping ceilings can be insulated using rigid insulation boards and usually have a layer of plasterboard on the inside of the insulation.

Under Floor Insulation

Older homes are most likely to have suspended timber floors. If you have air bricks or ventilation bricks on the outside wall(s) of your house that are below floor level, you probably have a suspended timber floor.

Timber floors can be insulated by lifting the floorboards and laying mineral wool insulation supported by netting on the ground floor between the joists.

Under Floor Insulation Smart Energy Homes
Cavity Wall Insulation

If your house was built after 1930 its more likely that you will have a cavity wall rather than a solid wall. A cavity wall is a wall made of two walls with spacing in-between (a cavity). if it was built before 2010 it probably wasn’t built with insulation but if it hasn’t already, can be retrofitted. There are a few different ways to insulate a cavity wall, the most recommend being the Climabead system.

Internal Wall Insulation

If your house was built before 1930 then you probably have a solid wall or stone wall. A solid wall is usually made of two layer of joined brick, and you can tell a solid wall from an alternating pattern, with some bricks showing the smaller ends from the outside.

Internal wall insulation is done by fitting rigid insulation boards to the wall, by building a stud wall filled in with insulation material such as mineral wool fibre or a combination of the both.

Inner wall insulation or Internal wall insulation.
What type of insulation does my property need?

The best places to find out what energy efficient measures your home has in place and which measures your home could benefit from is to check the properties Energy Performance Certificate (EPC). To check your homes EPC visit the Governments online database.

How much will insulation save me?

This can vary from property to property depending on many different factors but as an example The Energy Saving Trust have said that a typical semi-detached house could look to save £355 a year on loft insulation alone if there was none previously installed and it was topped to the recommended amount of 270mm.

Insulation is just one of the energy efficient measures available completely free under the ECO4 scheme. To learn more about ECO4 and to see if you’re eligible visit our website.

Here's just some of the measures that are available under ECO4

Heat Pumps

The most effective way to make your property more energy efficient and cut down on your energy bills is to make sure its well insulated.

Insulation

he most effective way to make your property more energy efficient and cut down on your energy bills is to make sure its well insulated.